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Welcome to the Go To Site for Arts and Special Education

 

Hello to arts educators and special educators!

It is a pleasure to invite you to explore our Division of Visual and Performing Arts Education (DARTS) website. It is designed to bring arts and special educators together. While that statement may not sound radical, it is, and here is the reason. Our DARTS webpage brings national, international, and community arts/special education organizations together and accessible for the first time. Before this DARTS website, finding information about arts organizations and arts for students with disabilities was difficult. You needed to know which organizations to contact and to be familiar with their professional language and key search words. For example, the seemingly simple word “creativity” can call up information about “business entrepreneurs.”

DARTS is the first Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) division to focus on arts education for students with disabilities. DARTS is also the first division to focus on collaboration between art, music, drama, and dance/movement educators and special educators. A goal of DARTS is to bring together professionals who recognize that arts education reaches and teaches to our students’ strengths.

Arts educators have long adapted their teaching to meet our students’ needs, often with little or no special education training. They have been the Ginger Rogers partner of the famous dance team of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers (she danced in high heels and backwards). DARTS welcomes arts educators to CEC and to CEC’s professional training information and opportunities. Now, though DARTS, we can share our stories and teaching approaches.

Look for our DARTS newsletters. Our newsletters will highlight arts/special education programs, events, and people, and share teaching successes and behavioral breakthroughs that come through the arts. We plan future DARTS teaching and research journals to highlight exemplary arts/special education programs and research. Look, too, for our DARTS presentations listed under CEC's annual professional convention. They will bring together colleagues who teach the visual and/or performing arts to students with disabilities and offer face to face networking time. Let’s work together to strengthen the arts education of students with disabilities and change STEM to STEAM!

You may already be a member of CEC. To find out more about joining DARTS, call 703-264-9400. Please share this information with arts educators. and help us spread the word about DARTS and CEC.

Take care,
Beverly Levett Gerber

DARTS President

gerberb1@southernct.edu 


 

Join us for new VSA webinars this November!

No Images? Click here

The Kennedy Center VSA Webinars / Nov 2016 #vsawebinars

 

 

Teaching Students with Autism:
What Teaching Theater Teaches Us

Tuesdays in November from 12:30 p.m. to 12:45 p.m.

 

Join us this November as we kick off a four part, mini-series of FREE lunchtime webinars on Teaching Students with Autism: What Teaching Theater Teaches Us. In this series, three psychologists will share insights from their research on how theater activities affect cognitive and social skills in children with autism spectrum disorders. On the final webinar, a special educator will discuss how those findings impact classroom practice.

 

Rounded Rectangle: Register Now!

 

Join us for new VSA webinars this November!

No Images? Click here

The Kennedy Center VSA Webinars / Nov 2016 #vsawebinars

 

 

Teaching Students with Autism:
What Teaching Theater Teaches Us

Tuesdays in November from 12:30 p.m. to 12:45 p.m.

 

Join us this November as we kick off a four part, mini-series of FREE lunchtime webinars on Teaching Students with Autism: What Teaching Theater Teaches Us. In this series, three psychologists will share insights from their research on how theater activities affect cognitive and social skills in children with autism spectrum disorders. On the final webinar, a special educator will discuss how those findings impact classroom practice.

 

Rounded Rectangle: Register Now!

 

P. Buckley Moss: Thankful for Her Teachers

When I was a child, I was very excited to go to school.  I wanted so much to be like my older sister Mary, who was a model student.  However, when I got there, I found that what I thought was going to be so much fun and so easy was something entirely different.  I was born in 1933, and at that time no one knew what dyslexia was, let alone the many other forms of learning differences.  It wasn’t until many years later, when I was grown and had children of my own, that I discovered I am dyslexic.

 I tried so hard to learn how to read and write, but the letters and the words just didn’t make any sense.  I often felt out of place in the classroom, and I would escape into my own imaginary world, drawing pictures of the stories and adventures taking place inside my head.  This would often lead to a visit to the principal’s office, followed by lectures and drama at home.  Thankfully, my Grandfather Buckley had faith in my abilities and was always encouraging.

I attended St. Clare’s, a Catholic school on Staten Island, where I was raised.  In spite of my academic struggles, a wonderful and caring teacher named Sister Regis spotted my talent as an artist and encouraged me to use that talent as a springboard to achieve all my dreams.  She urged my mother to find me special training.  My mother had grown up in the Italian section of Manhattan and attended Washington Irving High School, which was strong in the arts.  There, students gifted in art subjects were given every opportunity to pursue their gifts, provided they also did their best in the standard academic subjects.  My mother was determined that I would benefit from this school  

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Facilitating pARTicipation with Adapted Repurposed Tools

Deborah B. Schwind, M.Ed., OTR/L

Judith Schoonover, M.Ed., OTR/L, ATP, FAOTA

Loudoun County Public Schools

Every student can create with the right tool for the job!  Universal Design for Learning principles stress multiple means of engagement, representation, action and expression.  With simple modifications, it is possible to ensure that all students can be engaged, and express themselves through art.  Adaptations, modifications, and (very) low tech assistive technology (AT) supports can be used and customized to improve access to art with easily found materials.  Based on their experience providing support in art classes, two occupational therapists designed simple Adapted Repurposed Tool (ART) kits that can be put to immediate use. Everyday materials and dollar store delights were used along with traditional resources to develop a workshop for educators, paraprofessionals, and related service providers to support inclusive environments and participatory experiences for all students during art instruction.

The art room is a unique setting for students with disabilities as they can be successful and can actively engage not only with the materials but also with their peers.  "Learning through the arts" and not just learning in art can be quite powerful.  In the general education classroom, there are right and wrong answers.  During art instruction in the classroom or the art room, there is not a right or wrong answer when completing a project, since it is designed around self-expression.  For students with disabilities, participating in a class where they can express themselves without being incorrect can build self-esteem and foster independence.

Inclusion with typical peers in the art room allows for socialization and active engagement.  The benefits influencing academic achievement include development of

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Special Music Education

Alice-Ann Darrow

Special music educators are typically trained to teach music knowledge and skills to students with disabilities in the general school population. The primary purpose of music education programs for students with disabilities is to actively involve them in meaningful music experiences that develop music concepts and skills appropriate to the students’ individual functioning level. Music education may be provided through general music classes for elementary grades, music appreciation and music theory for upper grades and music performance classes such as band, orchestra and chorus. Special music educators typically have a background in special education or music therapy, and have expertise in instructional strategies for teaching students with a wide variety of disabilities. Students with disabilities are taught in their self-contained classrooms or in inclusive music classes offered in the school music curriculum.

Special music education goals follow the music standards set for all students. The standards emphasize conceptual understanding in areas that reflect the actual processes in which musicians engage. The standards cultivate a student’s ability to carry out the three artistic processes:

CreatingStudents need to have experience in creating, to be successful musicians and to be successful 21st century citizens.

Performing Students need to perform – as singers, as instrumentalists, and in their lives and careers.

Responding – Students need to respond to music, as well as to their culture, their community, and their colleagues.

Research in inclusive school settings supports music’s effectiveness with students who have a wide variety of disabilities. Special music educators may also address social and behavioral goals with their students, as well as use music to support the general education curriculum.To find out more information about special music education, please visit the  National Association for Music Education (NAfME) and International Society for Music Education (ISME) websites shown in the right column of this page.

Although there are no degree programs in special music education, a number of universities, such as Florida State University, Wichita State University, and James Madison University offer certificate programs or specialized study programs in special music education. In addition, NAfME regularly offers pre-conferences on teaching music to students with disabilities that precede their annual National Inservice Conference. 

Links to Related Arts Organizations

Following are links to the websites of national and community organizations concerned with the arts and special education. Indented titles lead you to papers describing how these organizations are involved with the intersection of special education and the arts.

ORGANIZATIONS FOR BOTH VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS EDUCATION

VSA          

CHECK OUT THE KENNEDY CENTER/VSA

CALL FOR PAPERS FOR

INTERSECTIONS 2017:

bit.ly/INT17callforsessions

VISUAL ARTS EDUCATION

National Art Education Association (NAEA)

      Special Needs in Art Education, Juliann B. Dorff

The American Art Therapy Association (AATA)​

      Adaptive Art and Art Therapy, Susan Loesl

Helen Keller Art Show--University of Alabama at Birmingham

       Slide Show of Helen Keller Art 

PERFORMING ARTS EDUCATION

Dance/Movement

The American Dance Therapy Association   (ADTA)

The National Dance Education Association   (NDEA)

Music

The American Music Therapy Association  (AMTA)

    Music Therapy in School Settings, Mary Adamek

International Society for Music Education (ISME)

The National Association for Music Education (NAFME)

    Special Music Education, Alice-Ann Darrow

Boston Conservatory Autism Program 

Theater

The Education Theatre Association   (ETA)

The North American Drama Therapy Association (NADTA)

COMMUNITY ARTS ORGANIZATIONS

The Arts In Special Education Consortium (ASEC)

MUSEUM ACCESSIBLE PROGRAMS

Philadephia Museum of Art

Warhol Museum

 


 
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Reprinting Articles


Feel free to reprint our articles, but please give credit to the authors and to DARTS. The content is to be printed in its entirety; additions, deletions or changes in the text, title or illustrations may not be made
.

 Format for citations:  Author's Last Name and initials. Title of article. Reprinted from the DARTS website (date), http://www.community.cec.sped.org/DARTS.